Bart Stupak

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Bart Stupak previously served the 1st Congressional district of Michigan

Bart T. Stupak, a Democrat, is a former U.S. Representative for the 1st Congressional district of Michigan, having served 1993 to 2011.[1]

Record and controversies

General information about important bills and votes for can be found in Congresspedia's articles on legislation. You can add information you find on how Bart Stupak voted by clicking the "[edit]" link to the right and typing it in. Remember to cite your sources!

Iraq War

Stupak voted against the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 that started the Iraq War.[2]

For more information see the chart of U.S. House of Representatives votes on the Iraq War.

Environmental record

For more information on environmental legislation, see the Energy and Environment Policy Portal

Pays wife for campaign work

In October 2006, the Sunlight Foundation, a Washington-based non-profit organization which advocates better transparency in government, reported that Stupak’s campaign committee paid his wife $49,500 to serve as the campaign’s treasurer during 2005-2006. [1]

Bio

Background

Born February 29, 1952,Stupak earned his Associate's degree from Northwestern Michigan College, a community college in Traverse City in 1972. He earned his Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice from Saginaw Valley State College in 1977, graduating magna cum laude, and he earned a J.D. from Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan in 1981.

Stupak began his career in public service as an Escanaba, Michigan police officer in 1972. He later served as a Michigan State Police officer from 1973 to 1984. Stupak served as a Michigan State Representative from 1989-90, representing Menominee, Delta, and Dickinson counties.

Congressional Career

Stupak was first elected to the House in 1992.

2006 elections

In 2006, the Republicans nominated Don Hooper to face Stupak in his November 2006 bid for reelection. (See U.S. congressional elections in 2006) [2] Stupak retained his seat.

Positions and views

Stupak is especially known for his severe mistrust of Accutane, an anti-acne drug made by Hoffmann-La Roche. He believes unadvertised psychological side effects from the drug drove his teenage son, B.J., to commit suicide. B.J. Stupak, a student popular amongst his peers and a football player at Menominee High School, shot himself in the head on May 14, 2000 hours after his junior prom [3].

He is currently one of several strongly pro-life Democrats in the House (others include Tim Holden, James Oberstar, and Dan Boren); his 2004 congressional campaign was endorsed by the National Right to Life Committee.

Stupak easily defeated Republican Don Hooper of Iron River in the 2002 and 2004 elections.

2010 elections

In April 2010, Stupak announced that he would retire. The House seat was won by Republican Dan Benishek in the fall election.[1]

Money in politics

This section contains links to – and feeds from – money in politics databases. <crpcontribdata>cid=N00004196&cycle=2006</crpcontribdata>

Links to more campaign contribution information for Bart Stupak
from the Center for Responsive Politics' OpenSecrets.org site.
Fundraising profile: 2006 election cycle Career totals
Top contributors by organization/corporation: 2006 election cycle Career totals
Top contributors by industry: 2006 election cycle Career totals

Committees and affiliations

Committees

  • House Committee on Energy and Commerce
    • Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials
    • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations - Ranking Minority Member
    • Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet

Committee assignments in the 109th Congress (2005-2006)

  • House Committee on Energy and Commerce
    • Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials
    • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations - Ranking Minority Member
    • Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet

Coalitions and caucuses

  • Caucus on Unfunded Mandates
  • Co-Chair, Law Enforcement Caucus
  • Congressional Auto Parts Caucus
  • Congressional Automotive Caucus
  • Congressional Boating Caucus
  • Congressional Grace Caucus
  • Co-Chair, Congressional Northern Border Caucus
  • Congressional Travel and Tourism Caucus
  • Democratic Homeland Security Task Force
  • Democratic Regional Whip
  • Democratic Study Group
  • New Democrat Coalition
  • Older Americans Caucus

Boards and other affiliations

  • National Committeeman, Boy Scouts of America
  • Member, Eagles Club
  • Member, Elks Club
  • Member, Knights of Columbus
  • National Guard & Reserve Components Congressional Members Organization
  • Member, Sons of the American Legion
  • Member, State Employees Retirement Association
  • Member, Wildlife Unlimited

More background data

Wikipedia also has an article on Bart Stupak. This article may use content from the Wikipedia article under the terms of the GFDL.

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bart Stupak profile, The Washington Post, accessed January 2011.
  2. Roll call vote, Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002.

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