Burshtyn power station

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{{#badges: CoalSwarm|Navbar-Ukrainecoal}} Burshtyn power station is a 2,334-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power station in Ukraine.

The station was studying options for closing four units replacing them with one or more new units totaling 800 MW, but plans stalled after public opposition.

Location

The undated satellite photo below shows the power station in Halych Raion.

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Background on existing plant

The Burshtyn TES (formerly Burshtyn GRES, renamed in 1996) was built from 1962 to 1969, consisting of 12 units of 185 MW - 195 MW each. It is owned by Zakhidenergo DTEK.[1]

The Burshtyn power station was disconnected from the national grid in 2002 to form the Burshtyn Energy Island, a separate grid that exists to export power to the EU nations of Hungary, Slovakia and Romania.[2]

According to the company's 2012 annual report, plans for the current units are as follows:[1]

  • Unit 1 - 195 MW (1965), retrofit 2010, planned: major overhaul in 2016; retrofit in 2020–2021 to increase the installed capacity by 15 MW
  • Unit 2 - 185 MW (1965), retrofit 2008, planned: major overhaul in 2014. Retrofit in 2019–2020 to increase the capacity by 25 MW
  • Unit 3 - 185 MW (1966), retrofit 2008, planned: major overhaul in 2013
  • Unit 4 - 195 MW (1966), retrofit 2007, planned: major overhaul in 2013; retrofit in 2018–2019 to increase the capacity by 15 MW
  • Unit 5 - 195 MW (1967), retrofit 1998, planned: major overhaul in 2015 and 2020; retrofit in 2012–2013 to increase the capacity by 13 MW.
  • Unit 6 - 185 MW (1967), retrofit 2010, planned: major overhaul in 2015.
  • Unit 7 - 206 MW (1968), retrofit 2012, planned: retrofit in 2007–2012 to increase the capacity by 21 MW
  • Unit 8 - 195 MW (1968), retrofit 2009, planned: retrofit in 2016–2017 to increase the capacity by 15 MW
  • Unit 9 - 195 MW (1968), retrofit 2006, planned: Retrofit in 2015–2016 to increase the capacity by 15 MW
  • Unit 10 - 195 MW (1969), retrofit 2004, planned: Retrofit in 2014–2015 to increase the installed capacity by 15 MW
  • Unit 11 - 195 MW (1969), retrofit 2011, planned: Retrofit in 2017–2018 to increase the installed capacity by 15 MW
  • Unit 12 - 195 MW (1969), retrofit 2012, planned: retrofit in 2018–2019 to increase the installed capacity by 15 MW

In 2014 DTEK said it retrofitted unit 5 of Burshtyn to 208 MW,[3] and would start working on unit 10 in November.[4]

Proposed new units

In 2013 the U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) provided a grant in the amount of US$602,435 to DTEK to fund a feasibility study on "modernizing" the Burshtynskaya Power Plant. DTEK plans to develop one or more units totalling 800 MW of new capacity. The units may be ultra-supercritical, supercritical, and circulating fluidized bed, with the "sizes of individual units dependent on multiple factors."[5]

According to the National Ecological Centre of Ukraine, only seven units on average have operated at Burshtyn since 2008, therefore the proposed retrofit may not clean up old units, but instead bring units that are not currently operating back online.[6] Alternatively, an entirely new 800 MW ultra-supercritical unit might be built.[5][7]

After public pressure the 800 MW unit was put on hold by USTDA in July 2013. On August 1, 2013, DTEK’s director for generation Serhiy Tazin resigned.[8]

As of March 2016 plans for a new 800 MW unit appear to be abandoned, although the project was included in "The plan for development of United Energy System of Ukraine for 2015-2024."[9]

Project Details of 800 MW expansion

  • Sponsor: Zakhidenergo DTEK
  • Parent company: SCM Holdings
  • Developer:
  • Location: Ivano-Frankivsk, Halych Raion, Ukraine
  • Coordinates: 49.210383, 24.666536 (exact)
  • Status: Cancelled
  • Capacity: 800 MW
  • Type: Undetermined; may be ultra-supercritical, supercritical, or circulating fluidized bed
  • Start date: 2019; however that date "considered unlikely"[7]
  • Coal Type: Hard coal
  • Coal Source: Lviv Volyny coalfield
  • Source of financing: USTDA

Resources and articles

References

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External resources

External articles