CCS Reg

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CCS Reg is a project headed by Carnegie Mellon University's Engineering and Public Policy Department with participation from "experts from the University of Minnestota, Vermont Law School and Van Ness Feldman law firm".[1] The aim of the project is "to design and facilitate the rapid adoption of a U.S. regulatory environment for the capture, transport and geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2)."[2]

Funding

The project is funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. In 2008 the foundation stated that it had allocated $1,850,000 over 2.5 years "to enable a team of investigators at Carnegie Mellon, University of Minnesota, Vermont Law School and other institutions to work with a wide range of stakeholders and experts to design a regulatory structure for the capture, transport and deep geological sequestration of carbon dioxide in the United States." [3]

CCS Reg Project Team

On its website, CCS Reg lists the members of the project team as:[4]

Carnegie Mellon University

University of Minnesota

Vermont Law School

Van Ness Feldman

Articles and resources

References

  1. "Project Team", Engineering and Public Policy Department, College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, accessed May 2010.
  2. "CCSReg Project", Engineering and Public Policy Department, College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, accessed May 2010.
  3. Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Foundation, "Climate change", Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Foundation website, accessed May 2008.
  4. "Project Team", Engineering and Public Policy Department, College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, accessed May 2010.

Related SourceWatch articles

External resources

External articles