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Oberlin College Plant

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The Oberlin College Plant in Ohio is a cogeneration facility that burns coal, and to a lesser extent natural gas and fuel oil, to generate heat, steam, and some electricity for the college. The heat from the furnaces is used to create steam, which is delivered to campus buildings through underground steam lines. The steam is also used to generate electricity, and the plant provides 5-10% of the campus's energy needs on an annual basis. The heating plant is responsible for about 30% of the College's total greenhouse gas emissions, approximately 10 tons of greenhouse gases per student.[1]

Oberlin College gets most of its electricity from Oberlin Municipal Light and Power System, which purchases most of the power used by the college from American Municipal Power - Ohio.[1]

Resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Campus Energy Use & the Environment" Oberlin College Website, accessed December 2009

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