Taean power station

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Taean power station (태안화력) is a 6,100-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power station in Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea. The plant is one of the top ten largest coal plants in the world.

In addition, a 300 MW IGCC plant is located at the site.

Location

The undated satellite photo below shows the Taean power station, which is located in Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea, 100 km southwest of Seoul.

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Background on Plant

The existing power station consists of eight 500 MW units built from 1995-2007.[1] The 4,000 MW plant provides power to the South Korean capital and the surrounding regions and is located in Taeangun, Chungcheongnam-do, about 100km southwest of Seoul.[2]

According to the country's 8th Basic Plan for Long-Term Electricity Supply and Demand (2017-2031), finalized in December 2017, Taean power station Units 1-2 will be converted to burn gas instead. The date of the proposed conversion is not listed.[3][4]

Description of Expansion

Units 9 and 10 of 1,050 MW each (2,100 MW total) are scheduled for completion in 2016.[5]

The new units were delayed due to accidents and defects. Before the completion of the project, the third stage of the turbine, which is the core cycle, was damaged and a fire occurred, delaying commissioning. Unit 9 was eventually completed in 2016, and Unit 10 is expected to be completed in 2017.[6]

Unit 10 was completed in 2017.[7][8][9]

Taean IGCC Project

The Taean IGCC Project is the first commercial integrated gasification combined cycle project to be built in South Korea. The project will produce syngas from low-BTU coal; the syngas will then be burned to generate electricity. As of 2014, the project was under construction and slated for start-up in late 2015.[10][11]

The IGCC plant is being considered for retrofit with carbon capture and storage technology by 2020, known as Korea-CCS2.[12]

On August 19, 2016, KEPCO announced the IGCC plant had begun operation.[13]

Project Details

  • Sponsor: Korea Western Power of Korea Electric Power Corporation
  • Location: Banggal-ri, Wonbuk-myeon, Taean-gun, Chuncheongnam-do
  • Coordinates: 36.9055681, 126.2346268 (exact)
  • Status: Units 1-10: Operating; IGCC Project: Operating
  • Gross Capacity: 6,100 MW (Units 1-8: 500 MW; Units 9-10: 1,050 MW); IGCC Project: 300 MW
  • Type: Units 9 and 10: Ultra-supercritical; IGCC Project: Integrated gasification combined cycle
  • Projected in service: Unit 9: 2016; Unit 10: 2017; IGCC Project: 2016
  • Coal Type: Bituminous[14]
  • Coal Source:
  • Source of financing:

Articles and resources

References

  1. "Taean power station," GEO, accessed Aug 2015
  2. "Hitachi wins order," Hitachi press release, Feb 28, 2012.
  3. "S. Korea to shift toward renewable energy, natural gas," Yonhap News Agency, 2017/12/14
  4. "Ministry announces 8th Basic Plan for Electricity Supply and Demand," Korea Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy, 2017-12-14
  5. "Emerson awarded $11 million contract to automate two 1,050-megawatt ultra-supercritical units at South Korea power plant," Emerson News Release, Nov 13, 2013.
  6. "국내 최대 석탄발전기 가동 초읽기," Naeil, Oct 27, 2016
  7. "건설中 원전·석탄발전, 차기 정권에서 운명은?," EBN, May 6, 2017
  8. "[논평노후 석탄발전소 가동중단에 따른 미세먼지 저감 효과,"] kfem.or.kr, Jul 25, 2017
  9. "Unit 10 of Taean Thermal Power Plant Starts Power Generation," Daelim, Feb 27, 2017
  10. "Gasification Users Association: Technology Status - December 2013," EPRI, Feb 27, 2014
  11. Jeff Phillips, "Update on Gasification Projects and Technology," EPRI, December 12, 2013
  12. "Korea-CCS 2," Global CCS Institute, July 14, 2014
  13. "Korea Western Power Begins Commercial Operation of Taean IGCC Power Plant," Business Korea, Aug 23, 2016
  14. "Coal-fired Plants in South Korea," Power Plants Around the World, accessed January 2017

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External resources